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Witches Chat is a 100% FREE online community for Witches, Pagans, the Spiritually inclined, and those seeking shelter from the storm. We don't have ads or membership fees.

WHAT WE DO

We disseminate literature and provide a platform for sharing news, information, and experiences in support of earth-centered spiritual paths.

WHY WE DO IT

To help people fall into love with the beauty of the world, and with each other; to help each other to give more than we take, be more inclusive, selfless, and exceptional.

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News

Theban Chat Room is working

  • Posted 1st August 2020, 2:29 AM
  • By Malatesa

The Theban Chat room is working again.

The Theban alphabet is a writing system, in particular a substitution cipher of the Latin alphabet used by early modern occultists and popular in the Wicca movement. Theban is used as a writing system, and it can be used as a substitute for the common ABCDEF Latin alphabet. Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa (1486–1535) included it in his De Occulta Philosophia,… Read more 0 comments

Older news

21st July 2020, 6:23 PM Software update 0 comments

Blogs

the market of beast???

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candy is in the usergroup ‘Radical activist’

  • Posted 3rd August 2020, 3:44 AM
  • By candy

hello fellow witches i have some questions my family keeps talking about the market of beast and that is you take it you'll go to hell. I personally am confused so i want to here witches opinions on it so if you heard of it can you please give me more info or tell me what you think of it.

thank you
love candy Read more 0 comments

the market of beast???

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candy is in the usergroup ‘Radical activist’

  • Posted 3rd August 2020, 3:44 AM
  • By candy

hello fellow witches i have some questions my family keeps talking about the market of beast and that is you take it you'll go to hell. I personally am confused so i want to here witches opinions on it so if you heard of it can you please give me more info or tell me what you think of it.

thank you
love candy Read more 0 comments

I will rulw witches chat

I am. Read more 1 comment

Older blog posts

25th July 2020, 4:31 PM Breaking Century 0 comments
25th July 2020, 12:02 PM Baby Witches Hexing/Cursing the Moon 6 comments

Recent Forum Activity

Solo green witch with a bunch of questions

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greatlakeswitch is in the usergroup ‘Radical activist’

Title says it all. I'm not a new witch exactly, and I'm not exactly in the broom closet, but I prefer to generally handle things solo. Sometimes, it would be nice to bounce ideas off of people, or ask people more knowledgeable than I am about certain things. I'm hoping that's where you guys come in. My garden is going great this year, and I'm creating all kinds of essential oils from the herbs I'm harvesting. I'm saving every bit of produce I can't eat now for the winter, and sometimes I sit in my garden and commune with birds. My sunflowers are practically gifts from me to the sun, which of course it gives right back in the form of more seeds and gorgeous flowers. I water my houseplants with moonwater and rainwater and they give it right back to me in the form of clean air and happy plants. All of that is going great.

I have some areas where I want to grow in my own craft, including my divination and tarot skills. I want to commune more closely with my own ancestors, but I struggle with the ideas of gods, spirits, the afterlife, and even the fae (which is the intersection of green witchcraft and all those intangible things, really, but I have had experiences that are difficult to explain.) So I'm hoping you all can help me out with that, and I can help you out with whatever knowledge I can share from my own experiences.

Thanks for having me. :leaf::tree::shamrock: Read more

New look on life

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Drhea Virgo is in the usergroup ‘Radical activist’

Im Daniel from the Appalachian mountains had so call witches in my family history plus Scottish Irish Cherokee indien need help with finding my path to enlightenment Read more

I will rulw witches chat

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Rae M Hansen is in the usergroup ‘Curious onlooker’

Hi my name is Raven people call me Rae. I am a brand new witch. to be honest i am truly excited. I got my name Raven from my alaskan native tribe the raven clan. Born with the name. I have the ability to commune with angels and the other side. I blessed to be here thank you. Read more

Baby Witches Hexing/Cursing the Moon

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Desteni Dawn is in the usergroup ‘Prophet/ess’

Im on Tiktok and I believe this to be true. The word on Tiktok is that 4 baby witches, under instructions from an older (not elder) more experienced witch with bad intentions, hexed (attempted to) the Fae, the moon and are supposedly going to attempt to hex sun next Read more

Hey there

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penna is in the usergroup ‘Radical activist’

  • Posted 22nd July 2020, 2:10 PM
  • By penna

Hi there, I'll go by Penna here. I'm around college aged and I've always had a lot of more spiritual inclinations since I was very young. I have experiences that I know for a fact were truly something; having a sense for energies and spirits etc, and being able to predict the future and such even when not looking to runs in my family.

When I was a young teen, I grew curious about paganism and witchcraft and the like. It was something always forbidden from my family, but I've always seen undeniable beauty in a wide variety of spiritualities and crafts and such. I have a lot of my own all encompassing spiritual theories and solid beliefs too, but I've never really been able to find somewhere to sit myself. But reading so much for so long still hasn't really helped me decide, so now I'm just curious to sort of see if I could possibly fit somewhere in this realm of practice and figured checking out a community and actually getting to talk to people could be a good way to sort that out! Read more

Quick Witch Tips

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Norwich is in the usergroup ‘Prophet/ess’

  • Posted 22nd July 2020, 10:36 AM
  • By Norwich

Quick-Witch Tips
Study Suggestions
1. The Triple Goddess and Horned God - represent Nature
2. The texts Charge of the Goddess & full Wiccan Rede as guidelines, not holy writ
3. Holidays as a cycle - Samhain, Imbolc, Beltane, Lammas
4. Elements - activating energies - ⏏️ air=vapor 🔼 fire=plasma; and
pacifying energies - 🔽 water= liquids ⏹ earth=solids
5. Using a circle as devotion, to shift consciousness & as magical support

Build personal skills
. Focusing - 🕯hold your gaze on a candle flame’s colorful dance until it’s all you see
. Grounding -  Connect your energy down the spine into the earth
. Centering - Draw power on the breath from earth & sky into the belly
. Projecting - Think it & push power from the belly & thru your hands 🙌🏽
. Shielding - Focus, ground, center, project energy from the belly to your aura

Your Workspace
. Meditate a few times to fill your space with good vibes to create a clean slate to build on before setting up your gear
. Prep table/tools - damp-wipe, incense, anoint with oil to hold a charge & magnetize with energy
. Gear: ⏏️ 💨 incense - 🔼 🕯candles,🗡blade - 🔽 🍷cup - ⏹ ⭐️ pentacle, 🧂salt - & ⚱️oil
. It’s OK to substitute aerosol for incense & to use LED candles when smoke & flame aren’t allowed. The symbolism fits. You can use a wand instead of a blade if you want, or your finger.
. Altar - place Passive(-) 🚺🕯,🍷,🧂to the left, & Active(+) 🚹🕯,🗡, 💨 to the right  & ⭐️ @ center for (-/+) polarity balance; energy flows from (-) to (+) so the altar mimics Nature.
. Simple circle will introduce the elements - Walk deosil 🔃 thrice - 1st spritzing 💦 salted-water, 2nd incensing 💨, 3rd 👆🏽Point and cast circle; Air-draw an earth-invoking pentagram ↙️⭐️ to begin & a banishing ↗️⭐️ to close. Ground yourself to end.

About Spells
. Choose items related to the goal by element, how it is used, suggestive appearance
. Use incantations to say what you want & don’t say what you don’t want
. Pull power to your belly on the breath, focus intent, push power thru hands into spell
. Methods  ex.,- bag/bottle, candle, cord/knot, mandala, petition, potion, sigil
. Intent ex., - protection (wards, banishing), prosperity (🥰🍀💰), purification (consecrate, cleanse)

Basic Candle Spell - spread a dab of olive oil onto a 🕯; hold it between your palms as you draw power to your belly & push intent into the cold candle. Speak your incantation 3 times. Stand the candle in its holder & light the wick. Air-draw 👆🏽 the invoking pentagram ↙️⭐️. Gaze at the flame for a minute thinking of the result you expect. Thank the Powers & let the candle burn all the way down. It’s OK to snuff & relight as needed. Put stubs in the trash.
. Tip - Place petitions under LED candles & reuse the LED candle again & again

. Petitions- write a goal in a few words on a 3-inch paper. Turn the paper 1/4 turn. Overwrite goal with recipients’ name & turn the paper 1/4 turn. Then overwrite all with your name. What is over dominates what is under. Anoint paper with oil & magnetize with your intent. Place the petition under a candle. Set timer. When the candle times out the spell is done. Shred or burn the paper when spell is done to release the spell.
. Turn the petition deosil ↩️ to attract or increase, turn it widdershins ↪️ to banish or decrease

Elemental Correspondence Mini-Reference
⏏️ E-Air:wand, incense, aerosol; 🟡; intellect; marjoram, mint, sage; feather, bubbles; citrine, yellow tiger eye
🔼 S-Fire:blade, oil, candle; 🔴; vitality, partnership; bay, basil, rosemary, pepper; carnelian, red jasper
🔽 W-Water:cup; 🔵; emotions, psychism; lemon, rose, chamomile, thyme; seashells, bells; turquoise, sodalite
⏹ N-Earth - pentacle, stone; 🟢; home, prosperity; grains, mugwort, patchouli, salt; hematite, jadeite, aventurine

. Read more

Howdy

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Norwich is in the usergroup ‘Prophet/ess’

  • Posted 21st July 2020, 3:20 PM
  • By Norwich

Hi, call me Norwich.  I began this convoluted witches path in 1988 after I was out walking my dog and had an unanticipated out of body experience. Then I spent the next few years figuring out what hit me and found some answers in Wicca - of all places. I didn't believe in witchcraft or know diddly about magic, but I'd had psychic stuff - voices & seeing things - happen since I was a kid. I'd have to call my route eclectic.  I've got 2 house cats who let me live with them (I've got the thumbs & can opener). Glad to meet ya.
  Read more

Lughnasadh

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bunnyrabbit is in the usergroup ‘Witch’

Lughnasadh

Lughnasadh (pronounced LOO-nah-sah) – Lammas - usually celebrated August 1st or 1st Full Moon of Leo or when the Sun reaches 15 degrees relative in Leo (in the Northern Hemisphere) or February 1st or 1st Full Moon in Aquarius or when the Sun reaches 15 degrees relative in Aquarius (in the Southern Hemisphere). Agricultural timing is also an option, as it might be celebrated as the first fruits of the harvest begin to ripen in the local fields or gardens. It is sometimes celebrated from sundown of July 31st through sundown of August 1st (in the Northern Hemisphere) or from sundown of January 31st through sundown of February 1st (in the Southern Hemisphere). In Ireland the first of August was celebrated as Lugnasad, in Scotland it was called Lunasda or Lunasdal. On the Isle of Man, it was called Luanistyn, and in Wales it was celebrated as Gwyl Awst or the Feast of August.

Lughnasadh got its' name from the Celtic god Lugh, sometimes spelled Lug. In modern times, He is sometimes considered a solar Deity. In ancient times, it is believed that He was the God of human skill, kings, and a patron of heroes. He was the king of the Tuatha de Dannan, a race of divine beings and their name translates to "people of the Goddess Danu." Danu is the Mother Goddess of water, the earth, fertility and victory.

This is the first of the Fall Harvest Sabbats and represents the beginning of the harvest cycle and the coming of Autumn. It is the turning point in Mother Earth's year; the waning of the God and the waxing of the Goddess. It is thought that the ancients originally celebrated this festival with a mixture of ceremony, feasting, and ritual theatrics, usually held on hilltops or riversides. It is believed that the first fruits of the grain harvest were taken to the hilltops and buried as an offering. The ritual play is believed to be a retelling of Lugh's triumph over blight and famine. There was much feasting on bilberries, the sacrificial bull’s flesh and the new food which was the predominant crop, which was grains and then in later times became potatoes.

Sometimes Lughnasadh is referred to as Lugh's wedding feast. There are references to Lugh's kingship wedding, though there are no references to His actually mating with anyone. Thus, the long tradition of the kingship often was being legitimized with the marriage to a Goddess figure. The kingship was thus legitimized by marrying a woman of royal birth. Such women were believed to be priestesses of the Goddess and as such the embodiment of said Goddess. Lugh's kingship wedding feast is thus believed to be symbolic of a coronation. He is thus united to the Goddess and the land and thus he is the legitimate king.

However, Lughnasadh is also referred to not as a wedding feast but as Lugh's funeral games that were held in honor of His stepmother Tailtiu (pronounced TAL-chi-uh) who was the wife of the last king of the Fir Bolg. When the Fir Bolg were finally defeated then Tailtiu married one of the new ruling class, the Tuatha de Danna. She, however, died after an exhaustive feat of clearing the fields of Ireland for agriculture. Thus, Lugh started the Fair of Tailteann in Her honor which includes feasting, games and sports. This fair was historically held annually on August 1st in a location midway between Navan and Kells in what is now called County Meath, Ireland, where Tailtiu was reputed to have been buried. This was also a time of romance, when partnerships were arranged between the available youth. Ceremonies were performed to formalize them at that time. Similar fairs were held in other parts of Ireland.

For those that couldn't attend the fairs, there were other ways to celebrate. Protection magic was widely practiced at this time. Cattle and horses were driven through a stream and other natural bodies of water for both protection and blessings. In Ireland, rivers and such were considered sacred, especially at this time. Other activities that were performed involved the first fruits of the harvest which was either offered up to the divine spirits or eaten ceremonially. Potluck-type of events were quite popular.

Another name for Lughnasadh is Bon-trogain. Bon meaning to bring forth and trogain meant the earth or ground. Thus, it meant to bring forth the harvest which comes from the earth. It is also known as Lammas which is from the Anglo-Saxon. One tradition was to bake a loaf of hallowed bread and then break it into four pieces and then crumble each piece in each of the four corners of the barn as a charm to invite blessings and ensure magical protection.

Lughnasadh is also a popular time to form trial marriages, sometimes called handfasts that traditionally last a year and a day. At the end of that time the couple may choose to end the partnership or continue it, sometimes making it permanent. The couple would sometimes exchange gifts which could be as simple as rings, gold coins, colored ribbons and gloves to name a few.

Surveys of all over the UK have shown that the August harvest celebrations held elements of both the Celtic Lughnasadh and the Anglo-Saxon Lammas meshed together. Just as modern Pagans have blended traditions from many places, times and people.

Other cultures have festivals at this time, most celebrating the first harvest. In Israel they celebrate Shavout, which not only celebrates the harvest but when Moses received the Torah. In India they celebrate Onam, which was in honor of King Mahabali who, when approached by Vishnu, dressed as a beggar, asked for some land and the King granted it to him. The King was buried in the earth but Vishnu granted that he would return once a year. This symbolized the planting of the seed and then the harvest. And in some countries, this is the time for mock battles and warrior games.

Today it is hard for most modern pagans to appreciate the significance of the first harvest. Most of us can enjoy most any food at any time of the year and there are rarely any shortages in the supermarket. Modern Pagans need to make a special effort to remember this is a significant time as without any harvest there will be no food in the stores. We need to remember to thank the Deities for the food we eat.

The first harvest is a significant indicator that all is well and that we can expect more treasures as the year progresses and each harvest is brought in. With a successful harvest our winter will be comfortable with plenty to eat. Who hasn't seen the rise of the cost of meat after a drought that caused a failure of grain crops in much of the country? So, the success of the crops and thus the harvest is very important to us, the modern Pagan.

Even as modern Pagans we are dependent on the Earth for our survival; not only for our food but for all the other things that we need. Shelter, water and the clothing that we wear is all dependent on our Mother Earth. So, it is appropriate for the modern Pagan to celebrate and give thanks for the first and all of the three harvest Sabbats.

There are many ways we can celebrate this Sabbat. Potlucks, picnics and other forms of feasting are quite popular and appropriate, as well as the gathering of wild herbs (though I suggest that you be very knowledgeable of the herbs that you wish to harvest in the wild as there are many look-alike plants of the ones that are safe but are actually poisonous). And never take more than one quarter of a plant. Of course, most magic and rituals usually focus on abundance, protection and fertility, though some will use the theme of death and the shedding away of the old. Offerings are also common to the various Deities and nature spirits as well as to the dead. It all boils down to saying thanks.

The rural Pagan and Witch will many times have their own gardens and so will be especially thankful for that first harvest. For them they can see right there before their eyes the magic of growing their own food and harvesting it. Cooking and feasting on the food you have grown yourself is quite enjoyable. Most rural Pagans and Witches will make offerings from the first and best of their harvest as an expression of thanks to the Deities that they worship and the spirits that abound in their area. This is also a favorite time for county fairs.

The urban Pagan and Witch has both advantages and disadvantages to being in the city. In the city, there are rarely any kind of woods to search through for wild berries or an area to have a bonfire. On the other hand, there are a lot more Pagans and Witches in which to celebrate with. Large cities tend to have a more open Pagan and Witchcraft community. The gatherings that city Pagans and Witches can enjoy can have attendances from a few to hundreds. Feasting, dancing, drumming and ritual are quite common at such events. It is very usual to be at these celebrations with family, friends and neighbors. However, many urban Pagans and Witches will seek out celebrations in the nearby rural areas. Or they will simply acknowledge what beauty of nature that they can find within their city, in parks and such.

The altar is often decorated with the best of the first of the harvest as your offering. Seasonal flowers are used as well as ivy and leaves. This is a time to bake the Sacred Bread and harvest herbs for the coming months. If you do make a figure of the God from bread, it may be used for the "Simple Feast" or Offering. Other traditional foods are: berries, crab apples, all grains, acorns (leached first of their poisons), and locally grown produce. A cake is sometimes baked and cider or other fruit juices can be used in place of wine or ale. You may want to plant the seeds from the fruit consumed in ritual. If they sprout, grow the plants with love and as a symbol of your connection to the Goddess and God.

Lughnasadh is a time for reflection, introspection and reconnection with the earth, us and the other inhabitants of our planet. Hold get-togethers to help you to reconnect with family and friends. Do volunteer work or just get out and about among people to reconnect with humanity. Socialize and have fun. Don't forget your loved ones that have passed on. Hold rituals and meditations that are focused on honoring them. Also, hold rituals to celebrate the harvest. Another great ritual honoring the harvest is one where you do the Ritual of the Bread Sacrifice. Of course, you can also do a ritual that honors Lugh and his many skills. A warrior meditation is also appropriate.

Spellwork for good fortune and abundance is especially appropriate. So are spells for prosperity, generosity and continued success, as well as protection spells and divination. This is a good time to practice magic that you normally wouldn't do as a challenge to your limitations, so suspend any doubts long enough to give it a try.

Wheat weaving, making corn dollies, etc…, are appropriate activities. Visits to fields, orchards, lakes and wells are also traditional. There are many pick-it-yourself farms where you can pick your own beans or berries. This can be a lot of fun for the family to pick their food then take it home and prepare it for a feast. Of course, bread is a major part of this Sabbat. However, if you are on a gluten free diet then you can still celebrate this sabbat with gluten free breads or other products that are harvested at this time. This is also a great time to go into the woods and hunt for things of nature that can become a magical tool. Just remember that there are places where you cannot collect so much as a pebble from, so know the laws of your area.

Any of these crafts can be very appropriate with children. Include them also in your rituals and celebrations so that they can learn a deeper meaning for this sabbat.

Herbs and fruits of the Sabbat: grapes, heather, blackberries, sloe, crab apples, grains and pears. Colors are: orange, yellow, brown and green.

A Lughnasadh Incense you can use is:
2 parts Frankincense
2 parts Benzoin or Gum of Arabic
3 drops of Pine Essential Oil or 1 part Juniper Berries or Pine Needles
1 part Oak Wood or Poppy Seed
1/2 part Borage or Thyme
1/2 part Gorse Flower or Bladderwack
1/2 part Basil

Another incense you can use is:
2 parts Frankincense
1 part Heather or Rose or Lavender
1 part Apple Blossoms or Rose
1 pinch Blackberry leaves
1 few drops of Ambergris Bouquet Oil

Ambergris Bouquet Oil
Cypress Oil or Juniper or Pine Oils
a few drops Patchouli Oil

Use for Lughnasadh Rituals, or at that time to attune with the coming harvest.
  Read more

Lughnasadh

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bunnyrabbit is in the usergroup ‘Witch’

Lughnasadh

Lughnasadh (pronounced LOO-nah-sah) – Lammas - usually celebrated August 1st or 1st Full Moon of Leo or when the Sun reaches 15 degrees relative in Leo (in the Northern Hemisphere) or February 1st or 1st Full Moon in Aquarius or when the Sun reaches 15 degrees relative in Aquarius (in the Southern Hemisphere). Agricultural timing is also an option, as it might be celebrated as the first fruits of the harvest begin to ripen in the local fields or gardens. It is sometimes celebrated from sundown of July 31st through sundown of August 1st (in the Northern Hemisphere) or from sundown of January 31st through sundown of February 1st (in the Southern Hemisphere). In Ireland the first of August was celebrated as Lugnasad, in Scotland it was called Lunasda or Lunasdal. On the Isle of Man, it was called Luanistyn, and in Wales it was celebrated as Gwyl Awst or the Feast of August.

Lughnasadh got its' name from the Celtic god Lugh, sometimes spelled Lug. In modern times, He is sometimes considered a solar Deity. In ancient times, it is believed that He was the God of human skill, kings, and a patron of heroes. He was the king of the Tuatha de Dannan, a race of divine beings and their name translates to "people of the Goddess Danu." Danu is the Mother Goddess of water, the earth, fertility and victory.

This is the first of the Fall Harvest Sabbats and represents the beginning of the harvest cycle and the coming of Autumn. It is the turning point in Mother Earth's year; the waning of the God and the waxing of the Goddess. It is thought that the ancients originally celebrated this festival with a mixture of ceremony, feasting, and ritual theatrics, usually held on hilltops or riversides. It is believed that the first fruits of the grain harvest were taken to the hilltops and buried as an offering. The ritual play is believed to be a retelling of Lugh's triumph over blight and famine. There was much feasting on bilberries, the sacrificial bull’s flesh and the new food which was the predominant crop, which was grains and then in later times became potatoes.

Sometimes Lughnasadh is referred to as Lugh's wedding feast. There are references to Lugh's kingship wedding, though there are no references to His actually mating with anyone. Thus, the long tradition of the kingship often was being legitimized with the marriage to a Goddess figure. The kingship was thus legitimized by marrying a woman of royal birth. Such women were believed to be priestesses of the Goddess and as such the embodiment of said Goddess. Lugh's kingship wedding feast is thus believed to be symbolic of a coronation. He is thus united to the Goddess and the land and thus he is the legitimate king.

However, Lughnasadh is also referred to not as a wedding feast but as Lugh's funeral games that were held in honor of His stepmother Tailtiu (pronounced TAL-chi-uh) who was the wife of the last king of the Fir Bolg. When the Fir Bolg were finally defeated then Tailtiu married one of the new ruling class, the Tuatha de Danna. She, however, died after an exhaustive feat of clearing the fields of Ireland for agriculture. Thus, Lugh started the Fair of Tailteann in Her honor which includes feasting, games and sports. This fair was historically held annually on August 1st in a location midway between Navan and Kells in what is now called County Meath, Ireland, where Tailtiu was reputed to have been buried. This was also a time of romance, when partnerships were arranged between the available youth. Ceremonies were performed to formalize them at that time. Similar fairs were held in other parts of Ireland.

For those that couldn't attend the fairs, there were other ways to celebrate. Protection magic was widely practiced at this time. Cattle and horses were driven through a stream and other natural bodies of water for both protection and blessings. In Ireland, rivers and such were considered sacred, especially at this time. Other activities that were performed involved the first fruits of the harvest which was either offered up to the divine spirits or eaten ceremonially. Potluck-type of events were quite popular.

Another name for Lughnasadh is Bon-trogain. Bon meaning to bring forth and trogain meant the earth or ground. Thus, it meant to bring forth the harvest which comes from the earth. It is also known as Lammas which is from the Anglo-Saxon. One tradition was to bake a loaf of hallowed bread and then break it into four pieces and then crumble each piece in each of the four corners of the barn as a charm to invite blessings and ensure magical protection.

Lughnasadh is also a popular time to form trial marriages, sometimes called handfasts that traditionally last a year and a day. At the end of that time the couple may choose to end the partnership or continue it, sometimes making it permanent. The couple would sometimes exchange gifts which could be as simple as rings, gold coins, colored ribbons and gloves to name a few.

Surveys of all over the UK have shown that the August harvest celebrations held elements of both the Celtic Lughnasadh and the Anglo-Saxon Lammas meshed together. Just as modern Pagans have blended traditions from many places, times and people.

Other cultures have festivals at this time, most celebrating the first harvest. In Israel they celebrate Shavout, which not only celebrates the harvest but when Moses received the Torah. In India they celebrate Onam, which was in honor of King Mahabali who, when approached by Vishnu, dressed as a beggar, asked for some land and the King granted it to him. The King was buried in the earth but Vishnu granted that he would return once a year. This symbolized the planting of the seed and then the harvest. And in some countries, this is the time for mock battles and warrior games.

Today it is hard for most modern pagans to appreciate the significance of the first harvest. Most of us can enjoy most any food at any time of the year and there are rarely any shortages in the supermarket. Modern Pagans need to make a special effort to remember this is a significant time as without any harvest there will be no food in the stores. We need to remember to thank the Deities for the food we eat.

The first harvest is a significant indicator that all is well and that we can expect more treasures as the year progresses and each harvest is brought in. With a successful harvest our winter will be comfortable with plenty to eat. Who hasn't seen the rise of the cost of meat after a drought that caused a failure of grain crops in much of the country? So, the success of the crops and thus the harvest is very important to us, the modern Pagan.

Even as modern Pagans we are dependent on the Earth for our survival; not only for our food but for all the other things that we need. Shelter, water and the clothing that we wear is all dependent on our Mother Earth. So, it is appropriate for the modern Pagan to celebrate and give thanks for the first and all of the three harvest Sabbats.

There are many ways we can celebrate this Sabbat. Potlucks, picnics and other forms of feasting are quite popular and appropriate, as well as the gathering of wild herbs (though I suggest that you be very knowledgeable of the herbs that you wish to harvest in the wild as there are many look-alike plants of the ones that are safe but are actually poisonous). And never take more than one quarter of a plant. Of course, most magic and rituals usually focus on abundance, protection and fertility, though some will use the theme of death and the shedding away of the old. Offerings are also common to the various Deities and nature spirits as well as to the dead. It all boils down to saying thanks.

The rural Pagan and Witch will many times have their own gardens and so will be especially thankful for that first harvest. For them they can see right there before their eyes the magic of growing their own food and harvesting it. Cooking and feasting on the food you have grown yourself is quite enjoyable. Most rural Pagans and Witches will make offerings from the first and best of their harvest as an expression of thanks to the Deities that they worship and the spirits that abound in their area. This is also a favorite time for county fairs.

The urban Pagan and Witch has both advantages and disadvantages to being in the city. In the city, there are rarely any kind of woods to search through for wild berries or an area to have a bonfire. On the other hand, there are a lot more Pagans and Witches in which to celebrate with. Large cities tend to have a more open Pagan and Witchcraft community. The gatherings that city Pagans and Witches can enjoy can have attendances from a few to hundreds. Feasting, dancing, drumming and ritual are quite common at such events. It is very usual to be at these celebrations with family, friends and neighbors. However, many urban Pagans and Witches will seek out celebrations in the nearby rural areas. Or they will simply acknowledge what beauty of nature that they can find within their city, in parks and such.

The altar is often decorated with the best of the first of the harvest as your offering. Seasonal flowers are used as well as ivy and leaves. This is a time to bake the Sacred Bread and harvest herbs for the coming months. If you do make a figure of the God from bread, it may be used for the "Simple Feast" or Offering. Other traditional foods are: berries, crab apples, all grains, acorns (leached first of their poisons), and locally grown produce. A cake is sometimes baked and cider or other fruit juices can be used in place of wine or ale. You may want to plant the seeds from the fruit consumed in ritual. If they sprout, grow the plants with love and as a symbol of your connection to the Goddess and God.

Lughnasadh is a time for reflection, introspection and reconnection with the earth, us and the other inhabitants of our planet. Hold get-togethers to help you to reconnect with family and friends. Do volunteer work or just get out and about among people to reconnect with humanity. Socialize and have fun. Don't forget your loved ones that have passed on. Hold rituals and meditations that are focused on honoring them. Also, hold rituals to celebrate the harvest. Another great ritual honoring the harvest is one where you do the Ritual of the Bread Sacrifice. Of course, you can also do a ritual that honors Lugh and his many skills. A warrior meditation is also appropriate.

Spellwork for good fortune and abundance is especially appropriate. So are spells for prosperity, generosity and continued success, as well as protection spells and divination. This is a good time to practice magic that you normally wouldn't do as a challenge to your limitations, so suspend any doubts long enough to give it a try.

Wheat weaving, making corn dollies, etc…, are appropriate activities. Visits to fields, orchards, lakes and wells are also traditional. There are many pick-it-yourself farms where you can pick your own beans or berries. This can be a lot of fun for the family to pick their food then take it home and prepare it for a feast. Of course, bread is a major part of this Sabbat. However, if you are on a gluten free diet then you can still celebrate this sabbat with gluten free breads or other products that are harvested at this time. This is also a great time to go into the woods and hunt for things of nature that can become a magical tool. Just remember that there are places where you cannot collect so much as a pebble from, so know the laws of your area.

Any of these crafts can be very appropriate with children. Include them also in your rituals and celebrations so that they can learn a deeper meaning for this sabbat.

Herbs and fruits of the Sabbat: grapes, heather, blackberries, sloe, crab apples, grains and pears. Colors are: orange, yellow, brown and green.

A Lughnasadh Incense you can use is:
2 parts Frankincense
2 parts Benzoin or Gum of Arabic
3 drops of Pine Essential Oil or 1 part Juniper Berries or Pine Needles
1 part Oak Wood or Poppy Seed
1/2 part Borage or Thyme
1/2 part Gorse Flower or Bladderwack
1/2 part Basil

Another incense you can use is:
2 parts Frankincense
1 part Heather or Rose or Lavender
1 part Apple Blossoms or Rose
1 pinch Blackberry leaves
1 few drops of Ambergris Bouquet Oil

Ambergris Bouquet Oil
Cypress Oil or Juniper or Pine Oils
a few drops Patchouli Oil

Use for Lughnasadh Rituals, or at that time to attune with the coming harvest.
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Balancing Chakras

barbcandelaria is in the usergroup ‘Prophet/ess’

Hello! I've been interested in learning how to balance my chakras and achieve as much wholeness as I can. I want to practice more meditation and possibly do Kundalini. I want to start by balancing my root chakra and making my way upward, and I'm fine with doing that and exploring myself on my own, but I was just wondering if anyone has any tips or things they wish they understood or knew before they started. Thank you! Happy witching. Read more

Need help to fix my mistake

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Silver Milk is in the usergroup ‘Prophet/ess’

i have a different username from my chat name. If I had the same username, I might be able to join chat without having to enter my password each time.?
Not an emergency, but I would like help having the same username for signin and chat.
Thank you. Read more

Masks, masks and about wearing the masks

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Resuecrof is in the usergroup ‘Witch’

  • Posted 15th July 2020, 6:28 AM
  • By Resuecrof

Just to throw it out there.
 I've seen videos of professional doctors who are the top of their field in viruses and there were explaining how everything we're doing is wrong
 
 And it's not really important what high level groups  Are always creating diseases wars and conflict and division between everyone.
If we all can learn not to be a part of the problem but a part of the solution.
 If we take down the walls of fear and hate division and anger.

1st we have to learn to think and believe positively

 For example the placebo effect has cured and healed so many people of deadly diseases.

I think the opposite is true also the naseebo effect is if you believe there's a disease and other people around you have it you get sick.

 I think it was 1931 auto Warburg won the Nobel peace prize or something like that for Bringing to our attention that cancer and these other diseases Just cannot do well in a normal alkaline level body
 Similar to your pool the waters either acidic or alkaline

So that's one cure for cancer and all these other diseases.
 Another way is oxygen I believe they did a study where if they lowered the oxygen level 30% and the blood cells they all turn cancerous.

I saw a man I think hes called the ice man he teaches deep breathing exercises to oxygenate your blood and he never get sick even if they inject his body directly with Eco lie disease.

Just something to think about instead of everyone being driven around by fear

All the leaders know people are driven to do things only by love or by fear

So for them everything is fear based from the badd news on TV to the wars rumors of war or diseases be afraid be safe. We are here to help you give up all of your rights for the false sense of security.

 What's interesting is on average 650000 people die a year with issues linked to the
 Seasonal flu.

It's also interesting I know here in the United States personally talking to medical professionals they list people with Corona virus with just about anything if you have a headache if you sneeze this week if you have a cough they check it off as Corona virus and log it into the system.

 I'm no expert by no means but I have studied the monetary systems in history.
And it seems like there are those who have mastered this technique of influencing the world……..
 And very few people if any that I know of actually know the difference between freedom and the illusion of freedom.

So whether you are fighting for the North or the South Or voting on the right or the left.  It seems like these are yet to sides to but to the same coin.
 That we are given to focus all of our attention on so have pride in your place of worship have pride in your state or country have pride in your clothes your job your financial position in the world have pride in your education Focus in on these things all the days of your life.


Is it even remotely possible these things were given to us to distract us from what is really going on?

 I really don't know anything I just thought I would throw my 2 cents out.

Blessed be and may peace love and light fill our hearts and all the days of our lives



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Merry Meet

  • Posted 14th July 2020, 11:09 AM
  • By Lynnea

Blessings, all, MM!

I'm Lynnea in the Inland Northwest. I moved up here to honor the wishes of my husband who died in 2018. I promised him before he passed that I would try to make a home for his son when he's released from prison.

You can find more info about me on my profile. Read more

I'm stetorkra

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stetsorkra is in the usergroup ‘Radical activist’

hi, I'm Stetsorka I'm new to this form and to witchcraft in general. I am just trying to find my path and figure out which is the right way for me. though I live in a very religiously diverse household and have had some guidance along the way I also am living in a very religiously divided area. I am happy to have found a safe space to learn and understand more about witchcraft and the various pathways therein. I realize a lot of what I already know is from multiple sources of multiple pathways many of which I no longer have contact with. I'm still young at 25 and my husband though supportive has his own beliefs already sorted out. I am looking forward to this religious journey and all the doors this may open. any and all suggestions and help starting out are welcome.

thankyou for taking the time to read this.
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